Window Cleaning

Formations

Previously we talked about different types of windows. Now we'll talk about formations. Formations can be made up of different types of windows but the type of formation is the same. For example Bay Windows. These could be all casement windows, all single/double hung, sliders on the sides and fixed in the middle, etc. There are a ton of possibilities and combinations when it comes to formations. There's two main reasons knowing formations is important. 

1. If the customer calls trying to explain their job. If you have a general idea of what people are talking about then you can assist them with information like a price or plan to get it done. 

2. For communication on the job. If you need your coworker to take care of something like a dormer window, it could get missed if they think that's something else. 

Bay Windows

A set of three windows with each side window angled, is  a formation called bay windows. These windows can be any type or variation of windows. 

Bay.jpg
Bow Windows

Bow windows are similar to bay windows however there are multiple windows put together to create a curved (bow) set of windows. These windows can be almost any kind of window in many variations. 

Bow.jpg
Dormers

Dormers are small structures on roofs that increase attic space, usually with a window. The window can be any type of window. If the dormer window is just in the attic, it's most likely fixed. If there's a loft or room inside, usually it will be a window with an opening sash. If you're unsure ask the customer. Sometimes customer's don't care about dormers that are just cosmetic and go into the attic. It might not be worth getting out extra equipment or dealing with safety concerns for a window someone won't look through. 

dormer.jpg
Sidelights 

Sidelights are long skinny windows usually next to front doors. They're often French style windows (true divided light, etc.) with dividers on the panes. They're usually fixed but sometimes they open similar to doors. 

sidelight.jpg
Palladian 

These are a formation common in certain types of architecture. Palladian windows sets can be French style windows (true divided light, etc.) with dividers on the panes. The sashes are usually fixed but not always. 

paladian.jpg
Atrium 

Atriums are open aired areas in architecture designs. These are often for courtyards or green/garden areas. These windows can be any type of window, often sliding glass doors or fixed panes. 

atrium.jpg
Garden Box

Garden boxes are popular in less rural areas to give people the opportunity to grow plants. These often have shelfs inside them, plants, and knickknacks. They can be time consuming and difficult to get to. It's recommended to have the customer remove their belongs for liability. They're often all fixed panes with single hung windows on each side, but not always. Whether you're doing interior or exterior, always start at the top and work your way down because of drips. In case of any bad seals it's recommended to start outside but not required. 

gardenbox.jpg
Clerestory 

Clerestory (pronounced clearstory) are windows that sit between a lower and high roof, being high up inside, unless there's some sort of loft or room to access them. These are usually fixed or awning windows, but not always. 

clerestory.jpg
Transom

These windows are on top of other windows or doors. Some houses have transoms on every window which could add significantly more time to the job. They're usually fixed or sliders but not always. The most common place to find a transom window is above the front door. 

Transom.jpg
Sunroom

Sunrooms are rooms extending off of other buildings with glass as the primary textile  of the structure. They can also be freestanding, and even have features allowing them to open. Don't move them unless you've been properly trained because it could lead to serious damage or a safety hazard. Sunrooms fluctuate daily in temperature variations because they absorb a lot of light. This can cause seals to go bad, so it's not uncommon for these to leak or have broken seals (you'll learn about that later). Whether you're doing interior or exterior, always start at the top and work your way down because of drips. In case of any bad seals it's recommended to start outside but not required.  

sunroom.jpg